Displacement

Ethiopia: Abiy’s Misstep on IDPs and How He Can Fix It

Ethiopia: Abiy’s Misstep on IDPs and How He Can Fix It

Intercommunal violence in Ethiopia has forced 1.4 million people to become displaced in 2018, the highest number of new internally-displaced persons (IDPs) in the world. For all the obstacles and uncertainties facing Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy’s administration, it is in their control – and interest – to make significant improvements in their response towards displaced Ethiopians. Mark Yarnell offers steps for improving the response.

RI Honors Hamdi Ulukaya, Senator Amy Klobuchar, and Hala Al-Sarraf

RI Honors Hamdi Ulukaya, Senator Amy Klobuchar, and Hala Al-Sarraf

On April 24, 2018, Refugees International hosted its 39th Anniversary Dinner, honoring humanitarians who work to improve the lives and protect the rights of refugees and displaced people in the United States and worldwide. This year’s event honored Chobani Founder and CEO Hamdi Ulukaya, Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, and Hala al-Sarraf, executive director of the Iraq Health Access Organization.

The Global Compacts on Refugees and Migration: Protecting People Uprooted by Disasters and Climate Change

The Global Compacts on Refugees and Migration: Protecting People Uprooted by Disasters and Climate Change

As UN member states meet to discuss the Global Compacts on Migration and Refugees, it is essential that they consider the specific needs of individuals impacted by natural disasters and the adverse effects of climate change. Those moving across international borders in the context of disasters and climate change do not always fall neatly within existing definitions of refugees and migrants, leaving the most vulnerable individuals without sufficient protection and at risk of human rights violations.

Political Pressure to Return: Putting Northeast Nigeria’s Displaced Citizens at Risk

Political Pressure to Return: Putting Northeast Nigeria’s Displaced Citizens at Risk

The crisis in Northeast Nigeria has reached an inflection point. Widespread famine no longer appears imminent, and the Nigerian military has pushed Boko Haram out of a number of cities and towns. However, the humanitarian crisis is far from over, and major challenges remain in responding to the needs of the internally displaced. At the same time, Nigerian officials are pressing for large-scale returns of the displaced to recently liberated areas—often before conditions can legitimately support returns. The Nigerian government should pause organized returns to insecure areas and work with the international community to improve services and protection for the displaced, while setting the stage for sustainable pathways home. In addition, the government must work to support local integration for those who may never return home.

Meeting the Urgent Needs of Hurricane Maria Survivors in Puerto Rico

Meeting the Urgent Needs of Hurricane Maria Survivors in Puerto Rico

In November, Refugees International carried out a mission to Puerto Rico to investigate the U.S. response to Hurricane Maria. Our team found the response by federal and Puerto Rican authorities  was still largely uncoordinated and poorly implemented, prolonging the humanitarian emergency on the ground. Thousands of people still lack sustainable access to potable water and electricity and dry, safe places to sleep.

Abuses and Denial of Aid Endangering Ethnic Minorities in Northern Myanmar

Abuses and Denial of Aid Endangering Ethnic Minorities in Northern Myanmar

This Refugees International report details how Myanmar’s military - the same military responsible for ethnic cleansing of Rohingya Muslims in western Myanmar - is also responsible for severe human rights abuses and blocking of life-saving aid to a mostly Christian minority in the north of the country.  A team from Refugees International was able to access a restricted area outside of government control in Myanmar’s Kachin State to document the conditions of displaced persons.

For Thousands Left Homeless by Hurricanes Irma and Harvey, Urgent Need to Prevent Long-Term Displacement

For Thousands Left Homeless by Hurricanes Irma and Harvey, Urgent Need to Prevent Long-Term Displacement

As the Caribbean, Florida, and Texas face the long road to recovery following Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, a window of opportunity exists to mitigate the human displacement created by these large-scale disasters and to build resilience to future events. These two priorities should inform how the United States is responding to these types of disasters. This blog outlines some important lessons that must inform the hurricane response in the future if we are going to keep pace with the increasing impacts of climate change impacts on population displacement:

On the Edge of Disaster: Somalis Forced to Flee Drought and Near Famine Conditions

On the Edge of Disaster: Somalis Forced to Flee Drought and Near Famine Conditions

At present, Somalia remains in the chokehold of a severe, protracted drought. The Somali government, the United Nations, and donor governments, including the United States, United Kingdom, and the European Union, deserve credit for acting early to address the risk of famine and avoiding a wide-scale loss of life. But the failure of the most recent rains and a third consecutive season of below normal harvest and pasture have prolonged the crisis and left significant numbers of Somalis destitute. RI traveled to Somalia in July 2017 to assess conditions for Somalis who have fled to urban centers seeking aid.

Surviving Somalia's Current Drought

Surviving Somalia's Current Drought

Somalia is again in the throes of another drought that by many accounts is worse than the last. Thankfully, greater government control and a prompt humanitarian response by the government and aid agencies have saved lives, but the scale of displacement is enormous. More than 760,000 Somalis have been displaced across the country since November 2016, 160,000 of them to Mogadishu. Here they are struggling to access assistance and protection in a dangerous and volatile environment.