Blog Post

U.S. Can Halt New Wave of Humanitarian Suffering in Syria

U.S. Can Halt New Wave of Humanitarian Suffering in Syria

With support from Russia and Iran, the regime of President Bashar al-Assad, has regained control over most of the country’s territory. Yet, the humanitarian situation continues to deteriorate. In the first eight months of 2018 alone, nearly 1.4 million people were displaced by violence. Now the warning lights are blinking red in Idlib and other areas outside of regime control. Many of the Syria’s 5.5 million refugees are under mounting pressure to return home before it is safe to do so.  

A Global Crisis: Refugees, Migrants and Asylum Seekers

A Global Crisis: Refugees, Migrants and Asylum Seekers

Refugees International President Eric Schwartz testified before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittee for Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organizations in a hearing on “A Global Crisis: Refugees, Migrants, and Asylum Seekers.”

Turkey Must Not Ignore Non-Syrian Refugees

Turkey Must Not Ignore Non-Syrian Refugees

As Turkey takes sole responsibility from UNHCR for processing the asylum claims of Afghans and other non-Syrians, it must register them and allow them to access their basic rights, say Refugees International’s Izza Leghtas and Jessica Thea.

Yemen Cease-fire Marks a Breakthrough, but Peace Is Far from Secure

Yemen Cease-fire Marks a Breakthrough, but Peace Is Far from Secure

Yemen’s internationally recognized government and the Houthi-led rebel movement agreed to a cease-fire in the port city of Hodeidah and its surrounding governorate on Thursday, following a week of UN–sponsored peace talks in Sweden. If it holds, this agreement would mark a major diplomatic breakthrough. Here’s why it matters and what to watch moving forward.

Migrant’s Compact Mischaracterized for Political Reasons

Migrant’s Compact Mischaracterized for Political Reasons

The Global Compact for Migration will only be effective if countries move forward with its implementation. However, what is important is that the compact’s 23 objectives embody a comprehensive set of best practices for managing migration in a safe, orderly manner which requires the cooperation of countries of origin, transit and destination.

Confronting the Link Between Climate Change and Migration

Confronting the Link Between Climate Change and Migration

The nations that are attending the Inter-governmental Conference on Migration in Morocco and the UN climate change negotiations in Poland clearly understand what the current U.S. administration does not (or doesn’t want to): Meeting the challenges of international migration and climate change is not a zero-sum game. Refusing to join cooperative efforts to find joint solutions does not make your own problems better, but worse.

Colombia: Two Crises in One Country

Colombia: Two Crises in One Country

A Refugees International team traveled to Colombia to bear witness to the experience of displaced Venezuelans. But they quickly discovered that it is impossible to view the Venezuelan displacement crisis on its own when there are already 7.7 million internally displaced people in Colombia amid ongoing internal armed conflict.

Civil Society Can Move Forward on Statelessness in the United States

Civil Society Can Move Forward on Statelessness in the United States

Eric Schwartz outlines an actionable advocacy campaign that civil society can undertake to move forward on the issue of statelessness in the context of an administration that is unlikely to make progress on the issue and in fact risks exacerbating statelessness in the United States.