Rohingya

The Obstacle to Rohingya Return Is Clear: It’s Still Myanmar

The Obstacle to Rohingya Return Is Clear: It’s Still Myanmar

Rohingya refugees continue to arrive in Bangladesh with stories of oppression at the hands of Myanmar’s security forces. Mark Yarnell and Daniel Sullivan report in the Diplomat on what they heard from newly displaced Rohingya during a recent Refugees International research mission to Bangladesh.

What You Missed in the UN Rohingya Report

What You Missed in the UN Rohingya Report

On August 27, the UN-mandated Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar released a devastating report concluding that the country’s military leaders should be prosecuted for the “gravest crimes under international law, against the Rohingya minority. While this aspect of the report has garnered the greatest attention, other important findings including that the crimes of the Myanmar military go far beyond those committed against the Rohingya, and that the burden of responsibility for those crimes extends beyond the military have gone largely unnoticed.

Holding Myanmar’s Military to Account—Why We Must and How We Can

Holding Myanmar’s Military to Account—Why We Must and How We Can

As we mark the first anniversary of the ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya minority from Myanmar, it is clear that too little has been done to support, protect, and provide for this marginalized community. Now, accountability is urgently needed to provide a sense of justice to the Rohingya, to act as a deterrent against further abuses of the Rohingya and other ethnic minorities in the country, and to help stabilize the region.

A Rohingya Refugee Describes His Flight from Violence in Myanmar

A Rohingya Refugee Describes His Flight from Violence in Myanmar

During a recent mission to the camps in Bangladesh which now houses tens of thousands of Rohingya refugees, Daniel Sullivan and Francisca Vigaud-Walsh interviewed Mayyu Ali, a young Rohingya man who described the crimes against the Rohingya people in Myanmar. Mayyu called on the international community to take concrete action to end the violence.

UN Security Council's Chance to Hold Myanmar Accountable for the Rohingya Crisis

UN Security Council's Chance to Hold Myanmar Accountable for the Rohingya Crisis

The Security Council delegation's visit to the destroyed Rohingya villages in Myanmar should be an important first critical step toward accountability for the ethnic cleansing in Myanmar’s Rakhine State, and an important step toward the type of conditions conducive to the voluntary return of Rohingya in safety and dignity to Myanmar. Now the UN and international community must deliver.

A Brighter Future for Refugees

A Brighter Future for Refugees

On Dec. 4, 2000, the United Nations General Assembly declared that June 20 would be "celebrated" annually as World Refugee Day. For millions of people displaced by conflict and persecution globally, there is little to celebrate, but World Refugee Day does present an opportunity to bring attention to their plight, and to the possibility of solutions.

Makeshift Living: Rohingya Refugees Struggle to Survive in Bangladesh

Makeshift Living: Rohingya Refugees Struggle to Survive in Bangladesh

Refugees International (RI) traveled to Bangladesh in May 2017, visiting the makeshift settlements for Rohingya refugees who have fled from neighboring Myanmar. More than 70,000 Rohingya have fled severe human rights abuses by the Myanmar military since October 2016, joining as many as 500,000 estimated Rohingya who have come to Bangladesh during decades of persecution in Myanmar.

Abuse of Rohingya Must Be Investigated

Abuse of Rohingya Must Be Investigated

On February 3, the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights released a report citing systematic violence by Myanmar security forces against the Rohingya Muslim minority population. The report concludes that the systematic nature of the abuses by the government security forces “very likely amount to commission of crimes against humanity”.

A Refuge of Vulnerability: Rohingya in Malaysia

A Refuge of Vulnerability: Rohingya in Malaysia

More than one hundred thousand Rohingya Muslims have fled violence and persecution in Myanmar in recent years. In May 2015, thousands were abandoned on boats on the Andaman Sea, after the discovery of mass graves in human trafficking camps along the Thailand-Malaysia border led to a crackdown on human traffickers. The primary desired destination for the Rohingya refugees has been Malaysia, where tens of thousands live unrecognized as refugees at risk of exploitation and in constant fear of detention. Their lives are generally better than in the home country they fled, but still far too vulnerable. 

A Tale of Two Sisters: Myanmar Exodus Haunts Rohingya in Malaysia

A Tale of Two Sisters: Myanmar Exodus Haunts Rohingya in Malaysia

Refugees International (RI) was just on the ground in Malaysia exploring conditions for several Rohingya communities who are among the tens of thousands who have fled persecution in Myanmar in recent years. Their journeys were often more horrific than the conditions from which they fled and their lives in Malaysia are only better in relative terms. The truth of this reality is starkly illuminated in the story of two sisters, Amina and Khadija.*

As Suu Kyi Visits the United States, Refugees International visits the Rohingya

As Suu Kyi Visits the United States, Refugees International visits the Rohingya

As President Obama welcomes Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi, the de facto leader of Myanmar, to the United States this week and celebrates her country’s democratic reforms, Refugees International will be traveling to Southeast Asia to meet with a population that is not welcome in her country: the Rohingya.