Mexico

Investigando los Desplazados Internos de México y El Salvador

Investigando los Desplazados Internos de México y El Salvador

Mexicanos y Salvadoreños siguen sufriendo ataques diarios contra los individuos, familias y comunidades a través de la extorsión, secuestros, violaciones y homicidios. Estos ataques son generalmente a manos de grupos y bandas criminales organizadas, pero a menudo, la policía y los militares están involucrados o específicamente orquestando eventos violentos. La inseguridad y la focalización de los ciudadanos de ambos países han causado desplazamiento interno masivo. Aunque el número verdadero de personas internamente desplazadas por el crimen organizado no es conocido, al menos 280,000 personas fueron desplazadas en cada país el año pasado.

Investigating Mexico and El Salvador’s Internally Displaced

Investigating Mexico and El Salvador’s Internally Displaced

Mexicans and Salvadorans continue to suffer from daily attacks on Individuals, Families, and Communities through extortion, kidnappings, rapes, and homicides. These attacks are faq frequently at the hands of organized criminal groups and gangs, but Too Often, the police and military are orchestrating Specifically Involved or violent events. The insecurity and targeting of the Citizens of Both Countries have led to mass internal displacement. While the actual number of people internally displaced by organized criminal groups is not known, Were At least 280,000 people displaced in each country just last year. 

In Mexico, Hundreds of Thousands Displaced by Crime

In Mexico, Hundreds of Thousands Displaced by Crime

Although official counts vary widely, hundreds of thousands of Mexican citizens are known to be internally displaced. Most of those who fled their homes left as a result of violence at the hands of organized criminal groups. The highest rates of displacement are found in Chihuahua, Tamaulipas, Nuevo León, Durango, Sinaloa, Michoacán, and Guerrero – all states hit hard by drug cartels and gangs.

 

Displaced in Mexico: Stuck on the Border

Displaced in Mexico: Stuck on the Border

It's understandable to assume that Mexicans crossing the U.S. border are seeking livelihood opportunities, and many of the thousands who enter are looking for jobs. But a growing number of Mexicans are fleeing their hometowns due to violence and persecution by organized crime and other armed actors. Refugees International visited Tijuana, Mexico, in May 2014 and met some of these people: mothers who had been denied asylum in the U.S. even though their spouses were allowed in; men who were deported from the U.S. but cannot go home because their states are in turmoil. Many church-affiliated shelters in Tijuana offer free accommodation for 15 days, after which these standed Mexicans must either leave town, move into hostels, or head out onto the streets.