IDPs

Ethiopia: Abiy’s Misstep on IDPs and How He Can Fix It

Ethiopia: Abiy’s Misstep on IDPs and How He Can Fix It

Intercommunal violence in Ethiopia has forced 1.4 million people to become displaced in 2018, the highest number of new internally-displaced persons (IDPs) in the world. For all the obstacles and uncertainties facing Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy’s administration, it is in their control – and interest – to make significant improvements in their response towards displaced Ethiopians. Mark Yarnell offers steps for improving the response.

The World Is Failing Internally Displaced People. Here’s One Solution.

The World Is Failing Internally Displaced People. Here’s One Solution.

More than one in 10 internally displaced people are in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where millions of IDPs are falling between the cracks of a humanitarian system in urgent need of reform. An important first step is to establish the position of special representative of the secretary-general (SRSG) for IDPs. 

Syrians Have the Right to Seek Asylum But Not the Means

Syrians Have the Right to Seek Asylum But Not  the Means

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights makes clear the right of every human being to seek safety in another country.  But eight years into the Syrian conflict, this most basic of human rights barely matters because there is so little leeway for people to leave Syrian territory in the first place.  If the international community truly wants to help Syrians, it must insist that Syria’s neighbors open their borders, and it needs to offer financial, technical and humanitarian assistance to make that happen. 

Security, Not Politics, Should Determine Returns to Bama

Security, Not Politics, Should Determine Returns to Bama

When the militant group Boko Haram took over in 2013, the majority of Bama, Nigeria's population those fled and have yet to return. Nigerian forces successfully recaptured Bama in 2015, and, recently, the city has become the focus of highly publicized reconstruction plans and along with plans for the return of its former residents. But the security situation in surrounding areas remains perilous. With approaching Nigerian elections in 2019, the government wants to return people to Bama, but security and stability should dictate returns, not politics.