Climate Displacement

Migrant’s Compact Mischaracterized for Political Reasons

Migrant’s Compact Mischaracterized for Political Reasons

The Global Compact for Migration will only be effective if countries move forward with its implementation. However, what is important is that the compact’s 23 objectives embody a comprehensive set of best practices for managing migration in a safe, orderly manner which requires the cooperation of countries of origin, transit and destination.

Confronting the Link Between Climate Change and Migration

Confronting the Link Between Climate Change and Migration

The nations that are attending the Inter-governmental Conference on Migration in Morocco and the UN climate change negotiations in Poland clearly understand what the current U.S. administration does not (or doesn’t want to): Meeting the challenges of international migration and climate change is not a zero-sum game. Refusing to join cooperative efforts to find joint solutions does not make your own problems better, but worse.

Puerto Rico’s Vulnerable Communities Remain Exposed to the Next Storm

Puerto Rico’s Vulnerable Communities Remain Exposed to the Next Storm

A year after Hurricanes Irma and Maria caused catastrophic damage to Puerto Rico, we returned to some of the hardest hit areas to meet with local community leaders, civil society organizations, and affected households where these encounters left us alarmed.

Amid Hurricane María Disaster in Puerto Rico, Strong Community Leaders Emerge

Amid Hurricane María Disaster in Puerto Rico, Strong Community Leaders Emerge

In the face of insufficient assistance from federal and Puerto Rican authorities in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, ordinary people have stepped up to become strong community leaders—ultimately strengthening community resilience and self-reliance. Yet they are largely being left out of recovery plans.

Moving Forward to Tackle Climate Displacement after the U.S. Withdrawal from the Paris Accord

Moving Forward to Tackle Climate Displacement after the U.S. Withdrawal from the Paris Accord

One year ago today, the Trump administration made its ill-advised decision to withdraw the United States from the historic Paris Climate Accord. The decision effectively sidelined the United States on this critical issue, moving the country from a position of international leadership. One year later, the world is moving forward to tackle the climate crisis and related displacement issues.

On Earth Day 2018, Time for a Make-Over?

On Earth Day 2018, Time for a Make-Over?

On April 22, 1970, 20 million people gathered across America marking the first Earth Day and the advent of a global environmental movement. Since then, the United States and other countries have adopted vital international agreements and national laws  to better protect our planet.  But in 2018, does Earth Day need a make-over? Nearly a half century later, the world faces a new threat that will have far more serious implications not just for the Earth but for human beings as well: climate change. 

Six Months After Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico's Civil Society Continues to Shore Up the Gaps

Six Months After Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico's Civil Society Continues to Shore Up the Gaps

Six months after Hurricane Maria, the slow response to the needs of the Puerto Rican people continues to be woefully slow. The Puerto Rican and federal authorities' failure to adequately respond has been nothing short of a travesty. Alice Thomas writes that if there is a silver lining to this disaster, it is the incredible dedication of Puerto Rico's civil society groups in working toward the recovery of their communities and their most vulnerable neighbors.

Two Months Since Hurricane Maria, Terrible Suffering Continues in Puerto Rico

Two Months Since Hurricane Maria, Terrible Suffering Continues in Puerto Rico

In short, two months after Hurricane Maria pummeled this island, the U.S. response remains too slow and bureaucratic, and lacks transparency and the broad information-sharing that is essential to an effective disaster response.

US Leads International Disaster Assistance Abroad, So Why are We Failing at Home?

US Leads International Disaster Assistance Abroad, So Why are We Failing at Home?

For the first time in its 38 year history, Refugees International (RI) is conducting a mission to the United States. Over the next week, my colleagues and I will be in Puerto Rico where eight weeks after Hurricane Maria made a direct hit, urgent humanitarian needs remain unmet.

For Thousands Left Homeless by Hurricanes Irma and Harvey, Urgent Need to Prevent Long-Term Displacement

For Thousands Left Homeless by Hurricanes Irma and Harvey, Urgent Need to Prevent Long-Term Displacement

As the Caribbean, Florida, and Texas face the long road to recovery following Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, a window of opportunity exists to mitigate the human displacement created by these large-scale disasters and to build resilience to future events. These two priorities should inform how the United States is responding to these types of disasters. This blog outlines some important lessons that must inform the hurricane response in the future if we are going to keep pace with the increasing impacts of climate change impacts on population displacement:

Surviving Somalia's Current Drought

Surviving Somalia's Current Drought

Somalia is again in the throes of another drought that by many accounts is worse than the last. Thankfully, greater government control and a prompt humanitarian response by the government and aid agencies have saved lives, but the scale of displacement is enormous. More than 760,000 Somalis have been displaced across the country since November 2016, 160,000 of them to Mogadishu. Here they are struggling to access assistance and protection in a dangerous and volatile environment.

On World Refugee Day, More Action is needed on Climate-Related Displacement

On World Refugee Day, More Action is needed on Climate-Related Displacement

War and conflict are no longer the primary drivers of displacement and humanitarian crises. More extreme weather and other climate change impacts are increasingly playing a role. In 2016 alone, 24 million people were forced from their homes by weather-related disasters, far more than were displaced by conflict. Meanwhile, more frequent and protracted droughts, especially in poor and unstable countries in Africa and the Middle East, are undermining food security, causing people to migrate in order to survive, and fueling pre-existing social and ethnic tensions.

Haiti Following Hurricane Matthew: A Rough Road Ahead

Haiti Following Hurricane Matthew: A Rough Road Ahead

In early October 2016, the Southwest region of Haiti was devastated by Hurricane Matthew, a category four storm. Tragically, the areas it hit were among the poorest. The government reported more than 2.1 million people were affected by the hurricane, with 800,000 in need of urgent food assistance. While four months have passed since Matthew hit, conditions on the ground are not much different today.  Haiti faces a long road ahead.

UN Moves Forward on Task Force to Protect So-Called "Climate Refugees"

UN Moves Forward on Task Force to Protect So-Called "Climate Refugees"

Nations will soon meet in Marrakesh to discuss progress on the landmark UN Climate Change Agreement reached in Paris last year. On the agenda will be the increasing impacts of climate change on displacement and migration, including a decision to establish a “Climate Displacement Task Force.” 

In Post-Disaster Myanmar, Building Resilient Livelihoods is Key

In Post-Disaster Myanmar, Building Resilient Livelihoods is Key

During the annual May to October monsoon season, Myanmar experiences low-level flooding, which creates favourable conditions for rice cultivation, Myanmar’s leading crop. However, in July 2015, heavier than normal downpours combined with the arrival of Cyclone Komen created unprecedented flash floods, general flooding, and landslides, a national disaster that affected 12 of Myanmar’s 14 states and regions. An estimated 1.6 million people were displaced and more than 20 percent of Myanmar’s cultivated land was damaged. 

In September, Refugees International returned to some of the hardest hit areas in Rakhine State, Sagaing Region, and Chin State to see how communities were recovering a year after the flooding. 

Myanmar's Disaster-Displaced Communities Face an Uncertain Future

Myanmar's Disaster-Displaced Communities Face an Uncertain Future

In July 2015, unprecedented monsoon rains, fueled by a tropical cyclone, caused flash floods that washed away San San Aye’s former home, along with 83 others in her village. More than one and half million people across the country were displaced in the disaster.

Humanitarian crises & climate change: What did the WHS Achieve?

Humanitarian crises & climate change: What did the WHS Achieve?

Earlier this week, some 9,000 participants from around the world gathered in Istanbul for the first-ever World Humanitarian Summit (WHS). The Summit was the brainchild of outgoing UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon who, during his tenure, has witnessed a humanitarian system strained to the point of breaking.