Two Countries and No Citizenship?

By Guest

A Generation of Syrians Born in Exile Risk a Future of Statelessness

By Sarnata Reynolds

Editor's Note: This blog by Sarnata Reynolds and Tori Duoos originally appeared on the website of the European Network on Statelessness.

The Human Rights of Stateless People: Testimony before the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission

By Refugees International

The following is Sarnata Reynolds’ testimony before the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission hearing on the Human Rights of Stateless People on March 23, 2014. A video of the hearing is available here

 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Co-Chairs McGovern and Pitts, and the members of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission for this opportunity to discuss the lives of stateless persons and the profound suffering they endure because they do not have legal identities. 

Syrian Refugees and the Right to Education in Turkey

By Sarnata Reynolds


“When we talk to people in the camps and cities, inside Syria and in Turkey, they say it’s ok if we don’t have enough food or health care, but it’s not ok if we don’t have education for our children.” 

Birth Registration in Turkey: Preventing Statelessness of Syrian Children

By Daryl Grisgraber

Imagine that your own birth was never officially recorded. Your family members and friends would know you, and know that you exist.  You might receive services from local organizations, like the church or the fire department. But what would happen when it’s time to enroll in school, get a job, or apply for a driver’s license? Now imagine all of this is happening to you in a foreign country. You fled your home because of war. But when it’s time to return home with the rest of your family, how could you prove that you belong there?

Things Get Worse: Rohingya in Bangladesh

By Sarnata Reynolds

About two years ago I secretly met with a dozen stateless Rohingya refugees in a hotel room in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh.  They were new arrivals from Rakhine State in Myanmar and had waded through shallow areas of the Naf River on the Bay of Bengal to escape violence and persecution. We met clandestinely because they were afraid that if they were identified as Rohingya, they would be arrested, detained, and sent back to Myanmar. Newspapers worldwide were reporting the expulsion of large numbers of Rohingya, and the refugees knew of others who had been spotted and deported. 

One Step Forward, Two Steps Back in Myanmar

By Sarnata Reynolds

Since a wave of violence displaced tens of thousands of Rohingya in June 2012, RI has visited Myanmar four times to document their humanitarian situation, publicize their persecution, and demand that the international community pursue a remedy for them as part of the normalization of relations with the Myanmar government. Now RI is returning to the country to push again for progress.

Protect Rohingya Rights - Before It's Too Late

By Sarnata Reynolds

On Thursday, members of the Rakhine Buddhist community in Myanmar attacked aid workers because they were providing food, water, and basic healthcare to their stateless Rohingya neighbors.

Kuwait's Stateless: Not Giving Up the Fight

By Sarnata Reynolds

On March 2, a 14-year-old boy named Ali Habib was put in a Kuwaiti jail and charged with disturbing the peace. He had been arrested while participating in a peaceful demonstration for the right to citizenship, one of many in a decades-long movement demanding that Kuwait’s stateless people, called the bedoon, be recognized as citizens. 

After two days Ali was released, but eight other stateless activists remain in jail on trumped-up charges including participating in an “illegal gathering” and “damaging police property.”

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