"We Are Becoming a Diaspora People"

By Daryl Grisgraber

Today, I spent the afternoon with a group of Syrian refugee women living here in Cairo. Some of them were considered vulnerable by the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and were able to get small amounts of aid for food and rent. Many had children who dropped out of school in Egypt in order to provide for their families. Most had husbands in Syria whom they worried about constantly. All were hoping to go somewhere besides Egypt, but were losing faith that it could really happen.

Keep Shining a Light on Bulgaria's Refugee Policy

By Diliana Markova

Despite some improvements in early 2013, which I described on this site last month, the situation of refugees in Bulgaria continues to raise concerns.

A War on Somali Refugees in "Little Mogadishu"

By Guest

Hungry and scared, I got up the courage to come out of our building in the morning to eat at a small restaurant on 8th Street in Eastleigh. What happened was so embarrassing. A Kenyan who was eating there immediately ran to the door and closed it before I came in. A few seconds later, the owner opened the door and told me, “Toka hapa” – “Leave here.” I walked back to my house starving.

This was the closest restaurant to our house. The Somali restaurants I sometimes visit were not open. Most of their owners and workers were spending their days in Pangani police station.

MONUSCO Eyes the Exit in DRC. Is That Prudent or Premature?

By Michelle Brown

Late last week, the Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution extending the mandate of the UN Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) for another year. The responsibilities of the mission remain largely unchanged and include protecting civilians and neutralizing armed groups. But the Council did do something new in the lengthy resolution: they made it clear that they were looking for the exit.

"The Worst Time I Experienced in my Life"

By Guest

In December 2013, in Juba, South Sudan, fighting broke out between soldiers of the Nuer and Dinka ethnicity within the presidential guard. This fighting quickly spread throughout the country, as the Dinka aligned themselves with the country’s president, Salva Kiir, and the Nuer aligned themselves with the former vice-president, Riek Machar. Despite attempts to negotiate an end to the fighting, battles between the national army and the opposition forces continue, and the country remains incredibly insecure.

Protect Rohingya Rights - Before It's Too Late

By Sarnata Reynolds

On Thursday, members of the Rakhine Buddhist community in Myanmar attacked aid workers because they were providing food, water, and basic healthcare to their stateless Rohingya neighbors.

Struggling to Respond in South Sudan, CAR

By Mark Yarnell

My colleague, Dara McLeod, and I are about to begin a mission to two neighboring countries in the center of Africa that are experiencing full-scale humanitarian crises: the Central African Republic (CAR) and South Sudan. Fighting inside each country has forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes.

Displaced in Kachin: Few Good Options

By Melanie Teff

In a recent meeting with a group of people displaced by the conflict in Myanmar’s Kachin State, I was reminded of the lack of options with which many displaced people can be left. When I asked the group why they were unable to return to their home villages, they laughed and pointed behind my head. I turned around and saw a line of at least 50 military trucks on the road behind us. They told me that they had seen at least 200 military trucks pass by the camp that day.

Displaced People Living in Mali's South Still Struggling

By Michelle Brown
With the large-scale humanitarian crises in Syria, South Sudan, and the Central African Republic, it can be easy to overlook the comparatively smaller humanitarian situation in Mali. However, as a recent briefing paper by the  Internal Displacement Monitoring Center reminds us, there remain acute humanitarian needs in Mali, where almost 200,000 internally displaced people (IDPs) continue to reside – still more than half of the 350,000 people living in displacement as of June 2013—the peak of the displacement crisis in Mali.  
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