The Tide Is Turning for Burmese in Thailand, But Which Way?

By Guest

Thailand’s migration and refugee policies have shifted since the military’s coup d’état in May. The Thai junta has initiated a policy of labor reforms, including a crackdown on undocumented migrant workers to allegedly combat corruption and human trafficking.

An Appeal for Unity in South Sudan

By Guest

In December 2013, in Juba, South Sudan, fighting broke out between soldiers of the Nuer and Dinka ethnicity within the presidential guard. This fighting quickly spread throughout the country, as many Dinka aligned themselves with the country’s president, Salva Kiir, and many Nuer aligned themselves with the former vice president, Riek Machar. Since then, 1.5 million people have been forced to flee their homes.

In the Horn of Africa, Saudi's Mass Deportations Have Devastating Impact

By Guest

In November of 2013, the government of Saudi Arabia began expelling large numbers of foreign nationals, including some 550,000 Yemenis, 180,000 Ethiopians, and 36,000 Somalis. While there has been little international attention or condemnation of these deportations, the returning individuals and their countries of origin have suffered many logistical, economic, and social ramifications due to this decision.

Afghans Wait and Hope for Peaceful Transfer of Power

By Dawn Calabia

This year Afghans surprised the world when seven million of them participated in a generally peaceful presidential election, despite threats by armed groups including the Taliban and Al Qaeda.

In Lebanon, Difference Between Refugees and Hosts Can Be Slight

By Daryl Grisgraber

During RI's recent visit to Lebanon, the conflict in Syria leaked over in one of the most dangerous ways yet: militants out of Syria clashed with Lebanese military forces in the border town of Arsal. The humanitarian community in Lebanon frantically tried to think of every possible way to get aid to those trapped there.

Celebrating Heroism on Mt. Sinjar; Preparing for What Comes Next

By Michel Gabaudan

During the past two weeks on Mt. Sinjar, we have seen both the worst and the best of what humanity can do.

Turning the Screw on Nairobi's Refugees

By Mark Yarnell

This post originally appeared at UrbanRefugees.org.

Sticking Up for Refugee Protection

By Jeff Crisp

In Australia, the navy is intercepting boats in international waters and incarcerating asylum seekers in floating prisons.  In Kenya, the government is deporting refugees to Somalia, despite the continued armed conflict and the increasingly serious drought in that country. Sudan has recently returned a group of refugees to Eritrea, one of the most authoritarian countries in the world. And the United States is refusing to admit many Mexican children who arrive at its border, despite mounting evidence that they are escaping from life-threatening and gang-related violence.

Tweets and Hashtags Aren't Enough

By Guest

#BringBackOurGirls. This slogan has been trending since April, when the Islamic Jihadist terrorist organization Boko Haram kidnapped more than 200 girls from their school in Borno State, Nigeria. Countless celebrities around the world – including U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama – have lent their voices to the social media campaign. But three months later, “our girls” have not been brought back. Although reports say approximately 50 have managed to escape, 276 girls are still missing.

Organized Criminal Groups, U.S. Protection, and the Principle of Non-Discrimination

By Sarnata Reynolds

More than 90,000 unaccompanied children are expected to arrive at the U.S. border this year. More than 20,000 of them will be of Mexican origin, but because they are being summarily turned around at the border little is known about their decision to undertake the journey alone, or the circumstances under which they traveled.

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