Afghans Wait and Hope for Peaceful Transfer of Power

By Dawn Calabia

This year Afghans surprised the world when seven million of them participated in a generally peaceful presidential election, despite threats by armed groups including the Taliban and Al Qaeda.

In Lebanon, Difference Between Refugees and Hosts Can Be Slight

By Daryl Grisgraber

During RI's recent visit to Lebanon, the conflict in Syria leaked over in one of the most dangerous ways yet: militants out of Syria clashed with Lebanese military forces in the border town of Arsal. The humanitarian community in Lebanon frantically tried to think of every possible way to get aid to those trapped there.

Celebrating Heroism on Mt. Sinjar; Preparing for What Comes Next

By Michel Gabaudan

During the past two weeks on Mt. Sinjar, we have seen both the worst and the best of what humanity can do.

In Lebanon, Lack of Aid Leaves Syrians with Impossible Choices

By Ann Hollingsworth

As we moved through the women’s community center near Beirut, we noticed a woman in her late forties, a Syrian refugee, in the workshop area. The walls were surrounded by ongoing and completed jewelry and craft projects, which the community center helps to sell to benefit the women who create them.

For Somalis, a Durable Solution Requires More Than Peace

By Alice Thomas

After decades of war punctuated by drought and famine, signs have emerged in recent years that Somalia may be heading toward a more peaceful and prosperous future. The terrorist group Al Shabab has been driven out of the capital and other areas (although attacks and assassinations are still a regular occurrence), a federal government has been elected and – despite limited capacity – assumed the reins of power, and economic projects are being planned and implemented. 

Urban Life Proves Disappointing for Beirut's Destitute Syrians

By Daryl Grisgraber

It’s Sunday morning in Beirut, and it’s quiet except for the bells of the church down the street. This is normally a bustling, noisy neighborhood, and it’s a nice change to be sitting here in a café when the day has not yet begun in earnest.

In Storm-Prone Philippines, It Pays to Be Prepared

By Guest

Less than a year after super-Typhoon Haiyan wrought havoc on the southern Philippines, the country is again in the thick of storm season. The latest was Typhoon Glenda, a category three storm that first made landfall over Albay Province on July 15, before continuing northwest and knocking out power over Metro Manila.

Sticking Up for Refugee Protection

By Jeff Crisp

In Australia, the navy is intercepting boats in international waters and incarcerating asylum seekers in floating prisons.  In Kenya, the government is deporting refugees to Somalia, despite the continued armed conflict and the increasingly serious drought in that country. Sudan has recently returned a group of refugees to Eritrea, one of the most authoritarian countries in the world. And the United States is refusing to admit many Mexican children who arrive at its border, despite mounting evidence that they are escaping from life-threatening and gang-related violence.

Kenyan Government Cracking Down on Somali Refugees

By Mark Yarnell

Four months ago, the Kenyan government launched a major crackdown against Somali refugees living in urban areas that involved mass arrests, extortion, and even deportations back to Somalia. This week, my colleague, Alice Thomas, and I are traveling to Kenya to assess the deteriorating situation for those refugees.

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