In Lebanon, Difference Between Refugees and Hosts Can Be Slight

By Daryl Grisgraber

During RI's recent visit to Lebanon, the conflict in Syria leaked over in one of the most dangerous ways yet: militants out of Syria clashed with Lebanese military forces in the border town of Arsal. The humanitarian community in Lebanon frantically tried to think of every possible way to get aid to those trapped there.

Celebrating Heroism on Mt. Sinjar; Preparing for What Comes Next

By Michel Gabaudan

During the past two weeks on Mt. Sinjar, we have seen both the worst and the best of what humanity can do.

In Lebanon, Lack of Aid Leaves Syrians with Impossible Choices

By Ann Hollingsworth

As we moved through the women’s community center near Beirut, we noticed a woman in her late forties, a Syrian refugee, in the workshop area. The walls were surrounded by ongoing and completed jewelry and craft projects, which the community center helps to sell to benefit the women who create them.

Urban Life Proves Disappointing for Beirut's Destitute Syrians

By Daryl Grisgraber

It’s Sunday morning in Beirut, and it’s quiet except for the bells of the church down the street. This is normally a bustling, noisy neighborhood, and it’s a nice change to be sitting here in a café when the day has not yet begun in earnest.

The Turning Tide in Egypt

By Jeff Crisp

Like most buildings on the seafront in Alexandria, Egypt’s second city, the Nady el Togoreen or “Accountants Club” has seen better days. The concrete is crumbling, the paint is flaking, and the club’s two outdoor swimming pools have long since been emptied of water. Now they are filled with broken deck chairs and sunloungers.

"We Are Becoming a Diaspora People"

By Daryl Grisgraber

Today, I spent the afternoon with a group of Syrian refugee women living here in Cairo. Some of them were considered vulnerable by the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and were able to get small amounts of aid for food and rent. Many had children who dropped out of school in Egypt in order to provide for their families. Most had husbands in Syria whom they worried about constantly. All were hoping to go somewhere besides Egypt, but were losing faith that it could really happen.

Keep Shining a Light on Bulgaria's Refugee Policy

By Diliana Markova

Despite some improvements in early 2013, which I described on this site last month, the situation of refugees in Bulgaria continues to raise concerns.

Syrian Refugees: Getting Beyond the Camps

By Daryl Grisgraber

The image of a crowded, dusty camp – full of tents and largely devoid of plant life – is probably what comes to mind immediately when you hear the word "refugee." You might think of Kenya’s Dadaab camp, which is currently the largest refugee settlement in the world, or of 80s-era photos of the Sudanese who fled to Ethiopia. You might even picture recent scenes from Zaatari, the camp in northern Jordan that is home to almost 100,000 Syrians who arrived in the past couple of years.

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