Displaced in Kachin: Few Good Options

By Melanie Teff

In a recent meeting with a group of people displaced by the conflict in Myanmar’s Kachin State, I was reminded of the lack of options with which many displaced people can be left. When I asked the group why they were unable to return to their home villages, they laughed and pointed behind my head. I turned around and saw a line of at least 50 military trucks on the road behind us. They told me that they had seen at least 200 military trucks pass by the camp that day.

Displaced People Living in Mali's South Still Struggling

By Michelle Brown
With the large-scale humanitarian crises in Syria, South Sudan, and the Central African Republic, it can be easy to overlook the comparatively smaller humanitarian situation in Mali. However, as a recent briefing paper by the  Internal Displacement Monitoring Center reminds us, there remain acute humanitarian needs in Mali, where almost 200,000 internally displaced people (IDPs) continue to reside – still more than half of the 350,000 people living in displacement as of June 2013—the peak of the displacement crisis in Mali.  

As Planning for Repatriation Ramps Up, Asylum Seekers Continue to Flee Somalia

By Mark Yarnell

At the same time that the Kenyan government is ramping up pressure for Somali refugees to return home, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) has released new international protection considerations for people fleeing southern and central Somalia. The guidelines highlight the continued risks that these people face and stress the need for ongoing international protection of Somali asylum-seekers.

Let's Hear It for the Hosts

By Jeff Crisp

When masses of refugees escape from one developing country and find sanctuary in another, they invariably place serious pressures on the people, land, environment, water supply, infrastructure, and public services of the areas where they settle. And yet the needs of refugee-hosting communities are all too often unrecognized and unmet.

This important gap in the humanitarian response to refugee emergencies is caused by a number of different factors.

What a Difference Six Months Make

By Jeff Crisp

This blog first appeared in The Hill Congress Blog.

I first visited Domiz refugee camp in May 2013. Situated near the city of Dohuk in northern Iraq, and spread out over 1.5 million square meters of land which once housed an army base, the camp accommodates around 45,000 Syrian Kurds who have escaped from the conflict in their homeland, the border of which is just 70 kilometers away.

The Start of Winter Brings New Dangers for Syrian Refugees in Jordan

By Guest

By Joanne Leedom-Ackerman

This blog first appeared in GlobalPost.

A Mosaic of Lives and Assistance - The Syrian Diaspora

By Eileen Shields-West

This blog first appeared in Politix.

Life in the Rohingya's Myanmar: A Q & A with photojournalist Greg Constantine

By Guest

Q: When RI visited Rohingya internally displaced people (IDPs) in 2012 and 2013, they were under a great amount of stress, with inadequate food, medical care, or shelter. Some had no shelter whatsoever. In December 2012, UN Under Secretary General Valerie Amos said that the camps as some of the worst she had ever seen. You visited the Rohingya people in November 2012 and February 2013. Can you describe the conditions you observed?

The Dying Breeds

By Michael Boyce

This post originally appeared on the SahelNow blog.

If you drive along the roads of northern Burkina Faso, as my colleagues and I have these past two weeks, you won’t always see the usual signs of human activity. While the population here is growing rapidly, the Sahel remains a sparsely populated region, and desiccated savannah dominates the landscape – stretching for miles into the distance.

Residents of Yida Camp Face Difficult Choices

By Caelin Briggs

Nila is tired. Two weeks ago, she arrived in Yida camp, South Sudan, with her three young children in search of safety and food. Like the many people that fled before her, Nila and her family escaped from their homes in the middle of the night after relentless bombings by the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) made it impossible for them to harvest their crops. As they hid in the caves away from the bombs, hunger set in, and finally they were forced to flee.

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