“I am too old to go out and find work. What will happen to me?”

By Ann Hollingsworth

We are in the refugee camp of Touloum in eastern Chad and the sun is bright. The camp is surrounded by desert for miles in every direction. It is quiet in the camp as we walk through, except for a small group of children who are playing outside and the occasional sound of a donkey trudging through the sand.  

The Crisis Continues for the Displaced in Central African Republic

By Mark Yarnell

Periodic violence, reprisal attacks, recent displacement – the town of Bambari, almost right in the middle of the Central African Republic (CAR), is emblematic of the continuing crisis in the country. In 2013, many areas in CAR descended into intercommunal violence following the overthrow of the government by an amalgamation of rebel groups from the north known as the Séléka. Christian militia groups, known as anti-Balaka, started fighting against the Séléka (composed primarily of Muslims).

Sudanese Refugees in Chad: Time for a Return to the Spotlight

By Ann Hollingsworth

The over 360,000 Sudanese refugees currently in Chad have been there for over a decade.  They fled to Chad after violence in their towns and villages in Darfur. And that violence in Darfur unfortunately continues. 

They Told Me Not to Forget Darfur. Then I Did.

By Michael Boyce

Twelve years ago, when I was a high school student living in a small New England town, I remember hearing about Darfur. I remember seeing news reports about the terrible conflict there, and about the hundreds of thousands of people whose villages had been burned or bombed, forcing them into exile.

Notes from the Turkish Border

By Michel Gabaudan

A few days in southern Turkey, in cities which have received Syrian refugees, leaves a complex feeling of both achievements and failures.

Turkey is currently the largest refugee hosting country in the world. More than two million Syrians have arrived over the past four years, and more are arriving as the conflict back home continues unabated. Every day, living conditions inside Syria become more precarious and dangerous.

Syrian Refugees and the Right to Education in Turkey

By Sarnata Reynolds


“When we talk to people in the camps and cities, inside Syria and in Turkey, they say it’s ok if we don’t have enough food or health care, but it’s not ok if we don’t have education for our children.” 

Conflict in South Sudan Continues More Than One Year On

By Mark Yarnell

South Sudan is continuing to reel from internal conflict that ignited in the capital Juba a little more than a year ago and quickly spread throughout the country. On December 15th, 2013, fighting erupted in Juba between soldiers loyal to former Vice President Riek Machar and those loyal to President Salva Kiir. More than one year on the fighting continues, primarily in Jonglei, Unity, and Upper Nile states in the north.

Two Tragic Anniversaries for the Philippines

By Alice Thomas

This month, the people of central Philippines are marking a sad anniversary. On November 8, 2013, Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest typhoons ever to make landfall, drove a path of destruction across the region, killing over 6,000 people and displacing some four million. 

The Plea from Congolese Women: Please Don't Leave

By Marcy Hersh

This blog first appeared on The Hill Congress Blog.

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