New Dangers, Evolving Protections: Responses to Climate Displacement

By Guest

Earlier this year, many heralded New Zealand’s grant of asylum to a family from the low-lying Pacific island nation of Tuvalu as the first legal recognition of “climate refugees.” This was not the case. While the applicants claimed that they would be victim to the impacts of climate change if returned to their country, the tribunal explicitly refrained from ruling on this matter and granted the family's appeal on unrelated humanitarian grounds.

Two Tragic Anniversaries for the Philippines

By Alice Thomas

This month, the people of central Philippines are marking a sad anniversary. On November 8, 2013, Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest typhoons ever to make landfall, drove a path of destruction across the region, killing over 6,000 people and displacing some four million. 

The People’s Climate March: Who I’m Marching For

By Alice Thomas

On September 21, thousands of people will come together in New York City to demand action on global climate change. The People’s Climate March, which comes in advance of the United Nations Climate Summit on September 23, will not only be the largest climate march in history, but also the most diverse.

For Somalis, a Durable Solution Requires More Than Peace

By Alice Thomas

After decades of war punctuated by drought and famine, signs have emerged in recent years that Somalia may be heading toward a more peaceful and prosperous future. The terrorist group Al Shabab has been driven out of the capital and other areas (although attacks and assassinations are still a regular occurrence), a federal government has been elected and – despite limited capacity – assumed the reins of power, and economic projects are being planned and implemented. 

In Storm-Prone Philippines, It Pays to Be Prepared

By Guest

Less than a year after super-Typhoon Haiyan wrought havoc on the southern Philippines, the country is again in the thick of storm season. The latest was Typhoon Glenda, a category three storm that first made landfall over Albay Province on July 15, before continuing northwest and knocking out power over Metro Manila.

Typhoon Trauma Stalks Survivors in Philippines

By Marcy Hersh

Every morning, Estralia wakes up in an unfamiliar environment, feeling unsure of where she is and where her home has gone. After a moment, all the terrible memories of Typhoon Haiyan come flooding back to her and she remembers the painful truth: everything has washed away.

Suffering & Displacement: The Human Cost of Climate Change

By Guest

On Saturday, February 22, scholars, humanitarian workers, activists, and religious leaders gathered at Washington’s National Cathedral to discuss why all of us should care about environmental sustainability and climate change and how can we help the people most affected.

Caring for Creation in a Changing Climate

By Refugees International

In 2012 and 2013 millions of people were forced from their homes by floods, storms, and other weather-related disasters. Millions more were affected by droughts, desertification, and degradation of the land, air, and water. While impacts are being felt in rich and poor countries alike, it is the most vulnerable people who suffer most.

The Calm After the Storm: Filipinos Struggle to Move on After Typhoon Haiyan

By Marcy Hersh

The island of Leyte in the Philippines may be one of the only places in the world where beachfront property is completely undesirable. Those who live along Leyte's eastern beaches know that the sea's destructive power can suddenly sweep away everything they hold dear.

Philippines After Haiyan: Job Well Done, or Work in Progress?

By Marcy Hersh

On November 8, 2013, Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest typhoons ever to make landfall, cut a path of destruction across the central Philippines, killing more than 6,000 people and displacing approximately four million.

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