Seeking Safety in Uganda

By Guest

On December 16 last year, refugees began to flood across the border from South Sudan into Uganda as a result of an outbreak of violence in their country of origin. In the past two months the number of new arrivals has grown to roughly 66,000. They are being hosted in three areas: Adjumani, Arua, and Kiryandongo.    

South Sudan: Coming Apart at the Seams

By Eileen Shields-West

This post originally appeared at Politix.

It was unbelievably festive on the day, July 9, 2011, that South Sudan became the world's newest independent country. From the United States, President Barack Obama sent a message that "the map of the world has been redrawn," and South Sudan's popularly-elected leader, Salva Kiir, declared that "the eyes of the world are on us now."

Between “Voluntary Repatriation” and Constructive Refoulement: The Case of Asylum Seekers in Israel

By Guest
On the 16th of September 2013, the Israeli High Court of Justice invalidated the Prevention of Infiltration Act (Amendment no. 3), that allowed the incarceration of asylum seekers from Africa for up to three years. During the months following the decision, while authorities were working exceptionally slowly to release asylum seekers from prison, the Israeli Knesset started working on a new bill to replace the invalidated act. And in less than a month, its swift legislation process was over. 

Israel Must Issue Birth Certificates Without Discrimination

By Sarnata Reynolds

This week, Israel submitted a legal brief to the High Court of Justice stating that it would stop issuing birth certificates to the children of foreigners born in the country. This new policy is purportedly intended to prevent migrants from making a claim to citizenship based on birth in Israel (an impossibility as Israeli law does not provide for this benefit unless at least one parent is a citizen of Israel). However, it may have the unintentional consequence of creating new stateless populations.

Missing the Boat: Europe’s Failed Migration Policy

By Jeff Crisp

Just a few years ago, the countries of the European Union (EU) thought they were finally getting control over the flow of refugees and asylum seekers across their borders. Having peaked at 670,000 in 1992, the number of asylum applications submitted in the EU fell rapidly in successive years, slumping to just 200,000 in 2006.

Five Issues to Watch in South Sudan

By Caelin Briggs

As we start the month of October, we thought it would be good to take stock of the recent developments in South Sudan, and to highlight some of the issues RI will be watching over the coming months.

Jonglei 101

By Caelin Briggs

In recent weeks, stories from the unfolding crisis in Jonglei State, South Sudan, have started reaching Western newspapers. More than 100,000 people are estimated to be displaced, trapped in soon-to-be malaria-infested swamps beyond the reach of aid agencies. The government of South Sudan has denied access to the displaced and wounded, leading to fears that the situation in this severely food-insecure state could rapidly deteriorate into a full-scale humanitarian emergency.

Kenya: Why Are We Forsaking Refugee Hosts?

By Guest

In a surprising reversal of government policy, Kenya’s High Court recently struck down a government mandate that, if implemented, would have forced refugees out of Nairobi and relocated them into camps.

UN Blocks Nutrition Solution for Yida

By Caelin Briggs

For much of the year, Yida refugee camp on the border of Sudan and South Sudan is hot, dry, and seemingly barren. (Watch our video to get a glimpse of camp life.) Yida’s 70,000 residents depend almost entirely on the World Food Program (WFP) for nutritional support, and receive rations of sorghum, yellow peas, oil, and salt. This diet has brought many people back from the brink of severe malnutrition. But while the refugees may not be starving, today we are seeing a new challenge emerge: nutrient deficiency.

Residents of Yida Camp Face Difficult Choices

By Caelin Briggs

Nila is tired. Two weeks ago, she arrived in Yida camp, South Sudan, with her three young children in search of safety and food. Like the many people that fled before her, Nila and her family escaped from their homes in the middle of the night after relentless bombings by the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) made it impossible for them to harvest their crops. As they hid in the caves away from the bombs, hunger set in, and finally they were forced to flee.

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