"The Worst Time I Experienced in my Life"

By Guest

In December 2013, in Juba, South Sudan, fighting broke out between soldiers of the Nuer and Dinka ethnicity within the presidential guard. This fighting quickly spread throughout the country, as the Dinka aligned themselves with the country’s president, Salva Kiir, and the Nuer aligned themselves with the former vice-president, Riek Machar. Despite attempts to negotiate an end to the fighting, battles between the national army and the opposition forces continue, and the country remains incredibly insecure.

Struggling to Respond in South Sudan, CAR

By Mark Yarnell

My colleague, Dara McLeod, and I are about to begin a mission to two neighboring countries in the center of Africa that are experiencing full-scale humanitarian crises: the Central African Republic (CAR) and South Sudan. Fighting inside each country has forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes.

Seeking Safety in Uganda

By Guest

On December 16 last year, refugees began to flood across the border from South Sudan into Uganda as a result of an outbreak of violence in their country of origin. In the past two months the number of new arrivals has grown to roughly 66,000. They are being hosted in three areas: Adjumani, Arua, and Kiryandongo.    

South Sudan: Coming Apart at the Seams

By Eileen Shields-West

This post originally appeared at Politix.

It was unbelievably festive on the day, July 9, 2011, that South Sudan became the world's newest independent country. From the United States, President Barack Obama sent a message that "the map of the world has been redrawn," and South Sudan's popularly-elected leader, Salva Kiir, declared that "the eyes of the world are on us now."

A Little Less Conversation, A Little More Action, Please

By Marcy Hersh

I’m exhausted. And not because of the rapidly approaching holidays. No, I’m exhausted because my schedule is packed with a seemingly endless stream of high-level meetings, panel discussions, roundtables, photo exhibitions, protests, marches, and congressional hearings – all of them focused on raising awareness of gender-based violence in emergencies.

Israel Must Issue Birth Certificates Without Discrimination

By Sarnata Reynolds

This week, Israel submitted a legal brief to the High Court of Justice stating that it would stop issuing birth certificates to the children of foreigners born in the country. This new policy is purportedly intended to prevent migrants from making a claim to citizenship based on birth in Israel (an impossibility as Israeli law does not provide for this benefit unless at least one parent is a citizen of Israel). However, it may have the unintentional consequence of creating new stateless populations.

Five Issues to Watch in South Sudan

By Caelin Briggs

As we start the month of October, we thought it would be good to take stock of the recent developments in South Sudan, and to highlight some of the issues RI will be watching over the coming months.

What's in a Speech? Obama at the UN

By Michelle Brown

With midtown Manhattan at a virtual standstill, the annual UN General Assembly speeches, side meetings, and high-level events have begun. But can this grand event produce solutions to the world’s most pressing problems?

Jonglei 101

By Caelin Briggs

In recent weeks, stories from the unfolding crisis in Jonglei State, South Sudan, have started reaching Western newspapers. More than 100,000 people are estimated to be displaced, trapped in soon-to-be malaria-infested swamps beyond the reach of aid agencies. The government of South Sudan has denied access to the displaced and wounded, leading to fears that the situation in this severely food-insecure state could rapidly deteriorate into a full-scale humanitarian emergency.

Kenya: Why Are We Forsaking Refugee Hosts?

By Guest

In a surprising reversal of government policy, Kenya’s High Court recently struck down a government mandate that, if implemented, would have forced refugees out of Nairobi and relocated them into camps.

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