Blog Posts by Sarnata Reynolds

July 14, 2014 Sarnata Reynolds Congress, U.S. Administration, Americas, Neglected Crises, Protection & Security

More than 90,000 unaccompanied children are expected to arrive at the U.S. border this year. More than 20,000 of them will be of Mexican origin, but because they are being summarily turned around at the border little is known about their decision to undertake the journey alone, or the circumstances under which they traveled.

June 10, 2014 Sarnata Reynolds U.S. Administration, United Nations, Humanitarian Response, Neglected Crises, Protection & Security

When my colleague, Garrett Bradford, and I met Pablo and Ana in Mexico City they had been displaced from their home, lost their fifteen-year-old son and son-in-law to an ambush by organized crime, and were still searching for their seventeen-year-old son, Juan, who had been kidnapped two months before. They are two of hundreds of thousands of Mexicans who have been displaced by organized crime and other armed actors in the last few years.

June 03, 2014 Sarnata Reynolds

The last time Zoila saw her three-year-old daughter was three months ago, when they crossed the Mexico-U.S. border and requested asylum in the United States. Because her daughter was a U.S. citizen, she was taken away and Zoila was put in an immigration detention center.

May 23, 2014 Sarnata Reynolds Congress, U.S. Administration, United Nations, Americas, Humanitarian Response, Neglected Crises

My colleague Garrett Bradford and I are currently in Mexico, where we are meeting with people displaced by organized crime, gangs, and other armed actors throughout the country, including in Tijuana, Mexico City, Veracruz, and Sinaloa. No one knows how many people have been forced to leave their homes in Mexico due to extortion, kidnapping, forced disappearances, or murders, but it is widely reported to be more than 100,000 people. 

March 28, 2014 Sarnata Reynolds Myanmar, Humanitarian Response, Asia, Protection & Security, Statelessness

On Thursday, members of the Rakhine Buddhist community in Myanmar attacked aid workers because they were providing food, water, and basic healthcare to their stateless Rohingya neighbors.