Blog Posts by Daryl Grisgraber

October 20, 2014 Daryl Grisgraber Congress, Iraq, Syria, U.S. Administration, United Nations, Humanitarian Response, Middle East, Protection & Security

In the center of Erbil, northern Iraq, just next to a highway overpass, we met Yezin and his family – refugees from the fighting in neighboring Syria. Nasser himself didn’t get up to greet us. He had been wounded in a mortar attack on his Syrian hometown of Aleppo. The field surgery he had received left a metal plate in his leg that doesn’t allow him to stand or walk on his own any longer. He and his family of seventeen are now living in an abandoned construction lot in Erbil, where it has been hard for humanitarian agencies to find and help them.

September 25, 2014 Daryl Grisgraber Iraq, Syria, Humanitarian Response, Middle East, Protection & Security, Women & Children

The humanitarian situation in Iraq is once again deteriorating. The siege of Amirli, the humanitarian airdrops to Sinjar – with people so desperate to get out that they fled into Syria – and now Western and Arab airstrikes, have kept all eyes on this tumultuous part of the Middle East.

August 19, 2014 Daryl Grisgraber Lebanon, Syria, Humanitarian Response, Middle East, Protection & Security

During RI's recent visit to Lebanon, the conflict in Syria leaked over in one of the most dangerous ways yet: militants out of Syria clashed with Lebanese military forces in the border town of Arsal. The humanitarian community in Lebanon frantically tried to think of every possible way to get aid to those trapped there.

August 06, 2014 Daryl Grisgraber Lebanon, Syria, Humanitarian Response, Middle East

It’s Sunday morning in Beirut, and it’s quiet except for the bells of the church down the street. This is normally a bustling, noisy neighborhood, and it’s a nice change to be sitting here in a café when the day has not yet begun in earnest.

April 10, 2014 Daryl Grisgraber Africa, Egypt, Syria, Humanitarian Response, Middle East, Protection & Security, Women & Children

Today, I spent the afternoon with a group of Syrian refugee women living here in Cairo. Some of them were considered vulnerable by the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and were able to get small amounts of aid for food and rent. Many had children who dropped out of school in Egypt in order to provide for their families. Most had husbands in Syria whom they worried about constantly. All were hoping to go somewhere besides Egypt, but were losing faith that it could really happen.