Congolese Dying to Feed Their Families as Food Cuts Bite

Congolese Dying to Feed Their Families as Food Cuts Bite

Hunger is a feeling that will not be denied. In times of famine or displacement, people inevitably make sacrifices to feed themselves and their loved ones. They sell their belongings; they do hard labor for little pay; they forego leisure, education, and even healthcare. They do so because if they can eat, then at least they will be alive. But today, in parts of the Democratic Republic of Congo, many displaced people are so hungry that they are risking their very lives – and fates worse than death – for a few cups of corn or beans. But instead of extending a helping hand, donor governments and humanitarian agencies have largely turned away.

Syrian Refugees in Northern Iraq: Desperate & on the Streets

Syrian Refugees in Northern Iraq: Desperate & on the Streets

Since the war in Syria began four years ago, more than 200,000 Syrian refugees have arrived in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq. The Kurdistan Regional Government, the United Nations, and international and local humanitarian agencies have all done what they can to help people survive. But as their time in Iraq grows longer, many of the Syrians are running out of money, no longer have personal belongings to sell, and are continuing to incur debt. Although some refugee camps do exist in the region, many families prefer not to stay in them. As a result, many are becoming so desperate that they end up living on the streets.

Washington Circle - Hosted by H.E. The Ambassador of Spain

Washington Circle - Hosted by H.E. The Ambassador of Spain

On September 30, 2014, the Washington Circle gathered for dinner at the residence of His Excellency The Ambassador of Spain, Ramón Gil-Casares. As the Honorary Chair of RI's 36th Anniversary Dinner, the Ambassador spoke of his time serving as the Spanish Ambassador to Sudan and South Sudan. In addition, the evening featured an around-the-world presentation and a back-from-the-field report on the displacement crisis in Iraq by RI President Michel Gabaudan. 

Yazidi Families Survive ISIS Attack But Face Uncertain Future

Yazidi Families Survive ISIS Attack But Face Uncertain Future

Last month’s advance by the militant Islamic State group (also known as ISIS or ISIL) in northern Iraq forced more than 100,000 people to flee their homes - including the Yazidi minority of Sinjar. Many of those newly displaced made their way to Erbil, Iraq, where they joined tens of thousands of Syrian refugees already seeking shelter in the city. There, they are struggling to get by. Aid agencies are working hard to locate the new arrivals who are living scattered across the city. The displaced often arrive not knowing where to go for help. Some find refuge with family members or friends, but others simply have no option but to settle in one of the city’s public spaces. Many of them lack food, water, and healthcare, and are living in makeshift shelters and unfinished buildings dangerously exposed to the elements, even as winter rapidly approaches. 

Between A Rock & A Hard Place: Shrinking Asylum Space

Between A Rock & A Hard Place: Shrinking Asylum Space

For decades, Kenya has provided a safe haven to thousands of refugees from neighboring countries fleeing war, persecution, and famine. While most reside in refugee camps, a significant number have made their way to urban centers like Nairobi where they have better access to jobs, education, and medical care. But growing insecurity within Kenya, including terrorist attacks by the Somalia-based terrorist group Al Shabab, have triggered xenophobic responses.

Friends in Los Angeles Dive Into Climate Displacement

Friends in Los Angeles Dive Into Climate Displacement

On June 24, 2014, Refugees International introduced its work to a new audience in Los Angeles. The event, hosted by RI Board Member Sam Waterston and his co-star from HBO’s The Newsroom, Thomas Sadoski, was held at the United Talent Agency in Beverly Hills. The evening highlighted RI’s short film Living on the Edge of Disaster: Climate’s Human Cost and featured a presentation and Q & A by RI’s climate displacement expert Alice Thomas. 

In Mexico, Hundreds of Thousands Displaced by Crime

In Mexico, Hundreds of Thousands Displaced by Crime

Although official counts vary widely, hundreds of thousands of Mexican citizens are known to be internally displaced. Most of those who fled their homes left as a result of violence at the hands of organized criminal groups. The highest rates of displacement are found in Chihuahua, Tamaulipas, Nuevo León, Durango, Sinaloa, Michoacán, and Guerrero – all states hit hard by drug cartels and gangs.

 

Displaced in Mexico: Stuck on the Border

Displaced in Mexico: Stuck on the Border

It's understandable to assume that Mexicans crossing the U.S. border are seeking livelihood opportunities, and many of the thousands who enter are looking for jobs. But a growing number of Mexicans are fleeing their hometowns due to violence and persecution by organized crime and other armed actors. Refugees International visited Tijuana, Mexico, in May 2014 and met some of these people: mothers who had been denied asylum in the U.S. even though their spouses were allowed in; men who were deported from the U.S. but cannot go home because their states are in turmoil. Many church-affiliated shelters in Tijuana offer free accommodation for 15 days, after which these standed Mexicans must either leave town, move into hostels, or head out onto the streets. 

Life in the DRC's "Triangle of Death"

Life in the DRC's "Triangle of Death"

Katanga may be the richest province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), but it is has quickly become one of the most troubled. For more than two years, two complex conflicts have been raging in the northern region of the province, known as the “Triangle of Death”: one involving the Mai Mai Bakata Katanga, self-declared secessionist rebels; and another pitting Pygmy villagers against their Bantu neighbors. Together, these conflicts have forced roughly 500,000 people to flee their homes. Today, the humanitarian response remains weak and the threats to civilians are growing. An RI team recently visited the territory of Manono, at the northeastern edge of the Triangle, to document the situation there.

South Sudan: Living Conditions for Displaced at UN Tomping Site

South Sudan: Living Conditions for Displaced at UN Tomping Site

South Sudan is on the verge of a catastrophic humanitarian crisis. Ongoing conflict since mid-December 2013 has forced more than a million people from their homes. Tens of thousands of these displaced are seeking shelter on UN bases across the country. At one site in the capital Juba, UN Tomping, the cramped living space and flood-prone land make for a disastrous scenario.

Squalid Conditions for South Sudanese IDPs in UN Base

Squalid Conditions for South Sudanese IDPs in UN Base

In South Sudan, fighting between government forces and troops loyal to the former vice-president has forced more than one million people from their homes. Since December 2013, approximately 270,000 people have fled to neighboring countries. Around 800,000 more are displaced within South Sudan – including 75,000 who are sheltering in UN peacekeeping bases across the country.

Bearing Witness in CAR

Bearing Witness in CAR

The Central African Republic (CAR) has been in turmoil since the Seleka rebel group overthrew the government in March 2013. Both during the coup attempt and in the months that followed, Seleka rebels (most of whom are Muslim) terrorized non-Muslim villages, forcing hundreds of thousands to flee their homes. In response to these attacks, the anti-Balaka, a primarily Christian militia, took up arms against the Seleka. Hundreds of thousands more people were displaced as a result of the fighting between the two groups, and many reprisal attacks were carried out against the country’s minority Muslim communities. An intervention by African Union and French forces is attempting to mitigate the violence. However, the country remains highly unstable, with many people still living in fear for their lives. 

Living on the Edge of Disaster: Climate's Human Cost

Living on the Edge of Disaster: Climate's Human Cost

Each year, millions of people are driven from their homes by natural disasters such as floods, storms, and droughts. Most live in the world's poorest and most conflict-ridden states, and lack the resources to recover after a crisis. As climate continues to change across the globe, natural disasters will become more frequent and more severe.

This short film examines the toll that our changing climate is having on some of the world's most vulnerable people, and the efforts being made to address this growing threat.

 

Philippines: Can't Stay, Can't Leave

Philippines: Can't Stay, Can't Leave

Typhoon Haiyan was one of the most powerful storms ever to make landfall. But as global climate change continues, such super-stroms could become much more common. That’s why, in addition to providing emergency relief, Philippine officials are trying to move populations away from the sea and clearing out so-called “no build zones.” Relocation may be necessary, but so far it has been a confusing and slow process. Families know they need to leave, but not where or when they will go, or whether they’ll have access to jobs and schools when they get there. It is vital that relocated families get the help they need quickly, and that the authorities respect their rights. 

Chicago Supporters Reflect on Twin Tragedies: Iraq & Syria

Chicago Supporters Reflect on Twin Tragedies: Iraq & Syria

Friends of Refugees International gathered for the 3rd Annual Chicago Circle at the Arts Club of Chicago on November 14, 2013. The evening featured Kirk W. Johnson – founder of The List Project and author of To Be A Friend Is Fatal. RI staff also shared their experiences working on the crisis in Syria, with a special focus on the challenges women and girls are facing as a result of the conflict.

United Arab Emirates: Nationality Matters

United Arab Emirates: Nationality Matters

It’s been five years now since Refugees International first visited the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to better understand and then call for solutions on behalf of the country’s stateless population – the bidoon.  Since mid-2008 there have been a number of media reports indicating that change was afoot, and that efforts were being made to tackle statelessness through a one-time only special registration process.  So, when the possibility popped up of visiting the country last summer, we took it.