For Many in the Central African Republic, the War Isn't Over

For Many in the Central African Republic, the War Isn't Over

The Central Africa Republic has been embroiled in civil conflict since a rebel movement from the north descended on the capital, Bangui, and overthrew the government in December 2013. While stability has since improved in some parts of the Central African Republic, the situation in the town of Bambari remains volatile. The UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) estimates that more than 80,000 internally displaced people (IDPs) are in the city and surrounding region.

The Crisis Continues for the Displaced in CAR

The Crisis Continues for the Displaced in CAR

Periodic violence, reprisal attacks, recent displacement – the town of Bambari, almost right in the middle of the Central African Republic (CAR), is emblematic of the continuing crisis in the country. In 2013, many areas in CAR descended into intercommunal violence following the overthrow of the government by an amalgamation of rebel groups from the north known as the Séléka. Christian militia groups, known as anti-Balaka, started fighting against the Séléka (composed primarily of Muslims). The conflict quickly pitted neighbor against neighbor in a brutal cycle of attacks and reprisal attacks, even as the Séléka were disbanded and an augmentation of international peacekeepers was deployed to restore order

Central Africa's Perilous Polls

Central Africa's Perilous Polls

The political struggle underway in Burundi has thrust that tiny Central African nation into the global spotlight. Burundi’s president, Pierre Nkurunziza, is seeking a third term despite being limited to two by Burundi’s constitution, and by the terms of a peace deal signed in 2000. Nkurunziza’s supporters maintain that his first term did not count because he was appointed by parliament rather than elected. His political opponents disagree.

A Return to the Central African Republic

A Return to the Central African Republic

More than two years since a rebel movement launched a violent campaign against the Central African Republic government, the country is continuing to experience a major humanitarian crisis. In March 2013, the Seleka group (an amalgamation of rebel groups from the north) overthrew the central government in Bangui, and since then sectarian violence between Christian militia groups, known as anti-Balaka, and former members of Seleka, who are mainly Muslims, has permeated the country. Further, inter-communal violence has pitted neighbor against neighbor, and the political conflict has also exacerbated simmering tensions between pastoralist and agriculturalist communities, resulting in violent clashes. 

Living in Fear in Nairobi

Living in Fear in Nairobi

It’s a sunny morning in the city of Nairobi. I am greeted on a busy street by my friend, Fatima. Fatima tells me about the difficulty she has had since I was last in Nairobi a year ago. She is a refugee from Somalia. She and her mother fled Somalia in 2009 after an attack by the Al Shabab terrorist organization. Her father was killed and her brothers were ‘lost’.  She and her mother arrived in the Dadaab refugee camp in northern Kenya, but her mother did not live long after their arrival.  On her own at the age of 14, Fatima, like many young unaccompanied women, chose to come to Nairobi. 

A "Protection Agenda" for Climate-Related Displacement Reveals Complexities, and No Easy Answers

A "Protection Agenda" for Climate-Related Displacement Reveals Complexities, and No Easy Answers

Each year, millions of people across the globe are forced to flee disasters, primarily floods, storms, and other acute, weather-related events. As the effects of global climate change continue to unfold, more extreme weather, growing food insecurity, and other drivers of displacement will only increase. Of utmost concern is how climate change will affect low-lying island nations who face increased storm surge, salt water inundation of fresh water resources, and sea level rise, threatening their very existence.

Three Steps Back for Israel's Asylum Policy

Three Steps Back for Israel's Asylum Policy

A few weeks ago, Israel began sending letters to thousands of asylum seekers informing them of their imminent deportation to an unnamed African country. If they resist deportation and refuse to “voluntarily” leave Israel, the letter claims, they will be sent to jail within 30 days. This is an unconscionable violation of the rights of asylum seekers.  

Assistance Denied: Aid and LGBTI Rights in the Congo

Assistance Denied: Aid and LGBTI Rights in the Congo

One day on the shores of Lake Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Micheline went to jail. The arrest probably did not come as a surprise to her. Working as a sex worker, run-ins with the police may have been a common occurrence for Micheline. But when she reached the prison on that particular day, things took an ugly turn.

The Importance of Birth Registration

The Importance of Birth Registration

“We must not forget the millions of stateless people whose dreams of nationality will never come to fruition. They also need our help to enjoy basic human rights right now,” remarked UN High Commissioner for Refugees António Guterres in 2007. Yet the international community often highly overlooks statelessness and the adverse implications of such status. While many individuals tend to take the legal acquisition of a nationality for granted, the acquirement of nationality can heavily dictate the quality of life for an individual.

Life for Syrian Refugees Outside of Turkey's Camps

Life for Syrian Refugees Outside of Turkey's Camps

The southeast provinces of Turkey, on the Syrian border, are home to hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees. Some of the refugees have been there for up to four years. Most are struggling to get by and trying to avoid having to go into a camp. The Turkish government is in the process of registering Syrians, but those who have not yet become “official” are not eligible for government assistance.