from our blog

April 24
Alice Thomas
Each year, millions of people across the globe are forced to flee disasters, primarily floods, storms, and other acute, weather-related events. As the effects of global climate change continue to unfold, more extreme weather, growing food insecurity, and other drivers of displacement will only increase. But with numerous conflicts raging around the globe and unprecedented numbers of refugees in urgent need of assistance, convincing governments to extend international protection to a new category of persons – so called “climate refugees” – has proven extremely challenging and, for multiple reasons, may not represent the best way forward.

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The southeast provinces of Turkey, on the Syrian border, are home to hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees. Most of these refugees are struggling to get by and trying to avoid having to go into a camp. The Turkish government is in the process of registering Syrians, but those who have not yet become “official” are not eligible for government assistance.

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In September 2013, fighting between the Armed Forces of the Philippines and a Muslim rebel group in the port city of Zamboanga on Mindanao forced 120,000 people - primarily minority Muslims - to flee. More than a year later, tens of thousands remain displaced, living in deplorable conditions.